YOU’RE
 NEVER TOO
         YOUNG

TO LOOK
AFTER YOUR
HEART

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SYMPTOMS RECOGNITION

 

Heart failure symptoms can be difficult to recognise.

Heart failure symptoms are not always unique or specific to one condition. They may be related to other conditions1, or disregarded entirely as a result of ageing or “being out of shape”. In a recent survey commissioned by AstraZeneca, only one in ten people recognised the symptoms2. Would you recognise the symptoms of HF? Test your knowledge with our HF symptoms quiz.

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

 

HF STORIES

 

 

Hear from others.

The fact of the matter is that HF is not merely reserved for the elderly or those of us with a family history of heart problems. While it is more common in people over 60, heart failure can affect people of all ages3. Providing education about what to look for can help people get diagnosed and treated early, which can help them live longer and enjoy a better lifestyle4,5. Listen to these stories and discover how others have learned to live with HF.

“I'm very determined, I want to live my life as best I can”

“Get them to quit smoking and drinking, it is a must”

“Everything can be quite normal and you can enjoy life as it is”

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

 

RISK CHECKER

 

Screening can lead to early diagnosis. Early diagnosis could mean a better prognosis.

If you or someone you know falls into the category of possibly being at risk of heart failure, it is important to talk to your doctor. Answering some simple questions around health and lifestyle can be key to identifying the possibility of HF early on.

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT HF RISK FACTORS

 

STATS & FACTS

 

 

HF is more prevalent than you may think.

It affects around 64 million people worldwide and is the leading cause of hospitalisation for those over the age of 656,7. Heart failure is as deadly as some of the most common types of cancer in both men (prostate and bladder cancer) and women (breast cancer), but has nowhere near the awareness and understanding of those conditions among the general public8,9. So, it’s important to arm yourself with this information and know the risks.

READ THE STATS

LEAD FROM THE FRONT

 

 

Proudly show your colours.

There are many misconceptions around HF and people may fear ‘standing out’ as someone living with the condition. This is totally understandable. However, it is also important for people with HF and their loved ones to show that there is life after HF, and the more recognition and awareness we bring to the condition, the more it can lead to future diagnoses and medical developments.

So why not become a HF Champion, break those taboos around HF and help us lead from the front?

BECOME A HF CHAMPION ON SOCIAL MEDIA

References

  1. InformedHealth. Heart failure: overview. Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG): Cologne, Germany. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279539/. Accessed 2 September 2020.
  2. AstraZeneca PLP. Data on File. ID: REF – 74964. March 2020
  3. Savarese G, Lund LH. Global Public Health Burden of Heart Failure. Card Fail Rev. 2017 Apr;3(1):7-11.
  4. Remme WJ, McMurray JJ, Rauch B, et al. Public awareness of heart failure in Europe: first results from SHAPE. Eur Heart J. 2005;26(22):2413-2421.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heart failure. Reviewed 9 December 2019. Accessed 26 March 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/heart_failure.htm
  6. GBD 2016 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 328 diseases and injuries for 195 countries, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Lancet. 2017;390(10100):1211-1259
  7. Díez-Villanueva P, Alfonso F. Heart failure in the elderly. J Geriatr Cardiol. 2016 Feb;13(2):115-7.
  8. Ponikowski P, Anker SD, Alhabib KF, et al. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide. ESC Heart Fail. 2014;1(1):4–25.
  9. Mamas MA, Sperrin M, Watson MC, et al. Do patients have worse outcomes in heart failure than in cancer? A primary care-based cohort study with 10-year follow-up in Scotland. Eur J Heart Fail. 2017;19(9):1095–1104.